Tag Archives: publishing contract

What is half-published, you say?

Half-published is when you’ve signed a contract with a publisher but your book isn’t out in the world yet.

Because yeah. That’s what’s happening. With me.

Like, what? Me? I have a what now?

*deep breath*

I am officially signed with Glass House Press for my INITIUM series, starring Fairian, my cranky answers-driven heroine, and Daimyn, my intense immortal guardian of the innocent.

*soundless flailing as I can’t decide what emotion to stick with*

Actually, I’m rather surprised at how I feel about it. I was thinking I’d be giddy, or so excited I felt sick, or doing the omg what did I just get into thing. Instead, I feel so light. With a huge dose of LET’S FREAKING DO THIS. I am so ready to make this happen I can barely stand it. I know at some point I’ll be overwhelmed by editing, marketing, etc — but right now I’m incredibly eager to make it happen and learn and see what works.

I feel solid. Grounded. Determined and excited. Which makes me feel like I’ve made a really good decision and am totally ready for this.

It’s going to be an incredible adventure.


The #PubLaw Twitter Talks

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Twitter is a marvelous thing, and holds many opportunities for us writers. Whether it’s connection with fellow writers, support, or reaching a broader audience, it’s a great resource for writers of all walks of life.

I particularly like the ‘talks’ that are held to spread knowledge and general writer love all throughout the online writing community. One of my recent favorites happens to be the #PubLaw twitter talks. #PubLaw was started by Susan Spann, a mystery writer and publishing attorney — which means she specializes in that scary, scary contract thing. She tweets about everything from short-form contracts to information about small publishers to the law surrounding pseudonyms.

She says she started the #PubLaw hashtag to fill the void in Twitter’s writing community. Information about contracts and publishing law can be a little thin, and are questions best answered by an attorney — a role she fits well, or obvious reasons. And now she generously spends time hosting talks to educate the Twitter-writer sphere about publishing and contracts, one subject at a time.

She also writes about publishing law more in-depth on her blog, which has a wealth of additional information.

I’m sure you’ve heard about scams and writers getting hurt because they didn’t completely understand their contract. We all think this won’t happen to us, but educating yourself can go a long way to keeping you safe (second to getting an agent or lawyer, of course).

All of which means you should check out Susan Spann and #PubLaw. Don’t be the next cautionary tale.

What resources do you use to help navigate publishing? And what are your stories of dealing with publishing contracts?