Tag Archives: inspiration

Branding Myself Journey (er, the Incomplete Journey)

Like any author in this day and age, “marketing” is a huge part of our job, traditionally published and indie alike. Marketing is this huge vast subject that scares the crap out of most authors, but includes things like: interaction on social media (with fans and other writers — and keeping consistent with whatever platforms you choose), ads on different sites, getting your book into the hands of reviewers, etc, and… branding.

I want to talk about what I’ve learned about branding. I’m definitely not an expert, but I’ve read a lot and am starting to feel like I’ve got my head halfway wrapped around the concept. Mostly, I wanted to share what I know while processing what I know.

Branding, simply, is what face you show to your audience. It’s what they associate with you when they think of you. In marketing in general, you want to cultivate a certain image of yourself and what you write so that you can more easily attract people that are going to align with what you have to offer (and hopefully want to buy your book!).

If you can attract people who are interested in the same thing as you, who have similar passions or motivations, they’re more likely to become loyal fans. This is opposed to, say, tweeting annoying ‘buy my books!’ links, or just talking into the void. That is vastly less successful, and honestly, will probably turn people off. Thought, technically, I suppose it is ‘marketing’ in the broadest sense of the word.

You can read a lot of advice about marketing in general, not book related, which can be pretty helpful. But for specific book-related marketing advice, I take a lot of it from BadRedHeadMedia. Her slogan is “Helping you help your damn self since 2011”, which I can’t help but like. She’s funny, concise, and her stuff really makes sense to me. A big shout-out to her.

(If you need somewhere to start with her, since we’re talking about branding, her Branding 101 article is really great, as is her The Reasons Branding Confuses You and How To Fix That Right Now.)

I’m going to snag another one of her phrases right here, too —

“You brand the author. Not the book.”

The point is, with branding, is that you’re developing attracting readers for YOU, THE AUTHOR, not a one-time book sale. Yes, books bring readers, obviously. But they’ll connect even more if they feel a connect to you, the author.

Sometimes I wince at that, because I wonder about the risks. Readers loving one book and not liking the next, or being put off accidentally by something I say, or, or, or. Most advice I read says being genuine and authentic is key to people connecting and liking you as an author, but there’s a lot of vulnerability in that too. Which is scary.

But I digress. I want to talk about what branding actually LOOKS like, which is what I struggled with when I first started consuming vast amounts of marketing advice.

So branding is what people think of when they think of you.

For me, I separate branding out into three parts into my head which helps me wrap my mind around it.

There are the esthetics

  • Colors
  • Symbols

There is your personality (sarcastic? funny? sweet? tough?)

  • Being authentic
  • Being genuine

There are the issues

  • What are you passionate about? The environment? Dogs? Happy endings?
  • These issues should be important to you, which could possibly connect you to a reader who also shares that interest and will then want to read your book.

Now, that’s just what helps me. I’m not a professional marketer, and those categories are far from clear cut from one another. They blend a lot. But it helps my head to see it that way.

As for my esthetics, I’m all about dark colors. I love blues and greens and purples. I generally have some sort of plant-related or dragon-related thing somewhere. I like sprawling landscapes and epic scenes. I also like grittiness, though — a hint of darkness and danger. I want to do an overhaul on all my sites to really portray this better. I also want to create a symbol that really encompasses me — to put in all sorts of places, including business cards and the like. I’m getting there.

My personality, well. I love sarcasm. But, I’m pretty much a bleeding-heart sap to my core, so there’s that. I’m more timid than I like, and it comes through when I make stances on issues, because I tend to over-think and just make myself go in circles. I like adding aspects of thought to conversation rather than arguing. I know, devil’s advocate personalities are the worst. I try to restrain myself.

Furthermore, I want to be intelligent but accessible. I want to teach, not preach. I want to break boxes and step out into new ways of thinking and perceiving the world… and bring everything else along with the ride. (Succeeding at this is a whole new story.)

As for issues… well, let’s get a little more in-depth with that.

Advice I’ve read from professional marketers state that you should choose 5-6 major issues to include in your branding, and 4-5 minor subjects.

Major subjects are more directly related to what your books are about, the image you really want people to identify with you. These are things that are most important to you that show up in your books.

For example.

Environmental issues have been a big part of my life forever, and when looking at my writing, it shows up. A lot. Whether it’s actual solarpunk I’m writing, or there’s historical significance for the world, or the main character is worried about an environmental issue.

I’m also a huge fan writing alternate history. I like messing with time and events and making something new. My INITIUM series, my first series being published, is alternate history. And historical truth in real life (winners writing the historical narrative) has also been an issue near and dear to my heart since… forever.

Then, there’s the fact that I write fantasy. I love fantasy and magic and tend to be daydreaming wherever I’m at. So, another theme that I like to fit into my branding is pointing out the moments of magic in real life. I’d love to be known for seeing magic in the drudgery. (This theme doesn’t come up as often as it should — I need to work on it.)

Right off the bat, those are three issues that I can post about that reveal who I am as a person and what I write about as an author.

Also, my editor suggested a while ago that my heroine, Fairian, is quite the strong female figure. She’s kind of a reluctant hero, not really wanting to change the world around her, but doing so for various reasons. So: women power. That’s another issue that can fit into my branding narrative, as my characters are generally pretty strong and feisty. It’s also a pretty popular one, which helps. I’m working on really making this more of a part of my branding, since it’s a pretty complicated subject and I’m not sure exactly what this looks like, to post about.

Another issue that’s been slowly showing up in my branding is mental health. I suffer from depression, so it’s natural to me, but I’ve never really been one to share it or talk about it. But, I’m realizing more and more, that a lot of people struggle with this issue, especially writers. My characters also tend to struggle with some sort of mental/existential issue in their paths, so it fits there, too.

Then, probably the most obvious theme that fits into branding me-as-a-writer, is #writinglife itself. That one doesn’t need much explanation: whether it’s ironic jokes or complaining about word counts or posting snippets or joining Twitter chats, that one fits in pretty naturally.

Do you see where I’m going with this? I’ve got 6 major themes to use for branding, right there.

  • Environmental issues
  • Real History, #OnThisDay History, etc
  • Magic in real life
  • Strong women
  • Mental Health
  • Writer’s Life

All of these themes fit into what’s in my books, in one way or another. But they’re also related to me, and give an idea of who I am.

(This also works into the esthetics and personality stuff I was talking about before. Esthetics: there’s a lot of plant and dragon related stuff. Personality: bleeding heart save the environment, sarcastic to the core because I fight depression and that means I can fight you. But it also means I’m almost always in existential crisis and people suck.)

Then there are the minor subjects. These are, from what I understand, things you post about less often but are more about rounding out who you are as a person. They don’t necessarily show up in your writing.

For me, these include:

  • Goats — I have 13 of them, and who doesn’t want to see baby goats?
  • Funny plants/animals — I always find the strangest creatures, and this fits into the environmental theme.
  • Working in retail/odd fruit and things — I work retail at a produce market and have some pretty funny stories, and the fruit and vegetables thing also works into the environmental theme.
  • Geeky/nerdy things — I play Dungeons and Dragons quite a bit, among other things.

*deep breath*

That was a lot of information. But is it starting to make sense?

In the reality of my own branding, I want a stronger presence of magic-in-reality and strong women, and I’ve been wondering how to take all of them to the next level. Because while I post things in these themes, I’m not sure they engage or inspire the way I want them to.

The last piece of important information I want to convey here (at least for this post) is about engagement. Posts with high engagement contain one of these elements:

  • Challenge — does it challenge the person reading it?
  • Curiosity — does it satisfy or inflame a curiosity?
  • Fantasy — does it lead the person on a journey, a fantasy, a place they want to go?

In other words, when you’re posting this or that having to do with one of your themes, you tailor it with one of the three ideas above so that it really hits home for whoever is reading it. You want to inspire someone, somehow — and if you can do that, your post is going to get more engagement, but more importantly, people are going to remember you.

I haven’t quite figured out how to do this yet. I’m going to write another post at some point that goes more in depth on how I take my themes and turn them into actual content… but to be honest I don’t think I’ve figured out the reality of what all of this looks like.

I post a lot of environmental news on FaceBook and generally do a few #OnThisDay posts a few times a week, and my Instagram is full of amazing fantasy artists (and goats), and Twitter is all sorts of tweets about writing life and retail nonsense and different chats. But I want to inspire more, engage people more. I want more of my personality to bleed through, while at the same time, my introvert-self is like Oh HELL no.

But I think if I can find my groove, my way of being awesome and vulnerable to the world, I’ll really like it. I love Instagram for this reason — I love showing off art from amazing artists, and being inspired about writing something in turn. Branding should be fun, and while work, you shouldn’t hate it.

At least, that’s what I think.

 

Alrighty, I think this post has gone on long enough! Kudos for reading this whole thing — and I hope it was helpful. Like I said, I’ll be writing another post that goes more in depth on how I’m turning this information into content. Mostly because I like writing all of this out… and I hope you get some inspiration from it too.

 

Thanks for sticking through with me through my two month absence. ❤ I’ll be writing another Behind the Scenes in Publishing post here soon! I’m going to talk about contract writing versus writing from the heart…

Questions? Comments? Additions? Concerns? What did you think? What works for you in branding yourself?

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The Concept of Flood Without Water

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Earlier this year I conceived a fun idea: an antediluvian post-apocalyptic sci-fi. (That first word, in case you needed to know, means pre-bibical-flood). The idea started forming when I started reading up on things called Ooparts.

What are Ooparts? Out Of Place Artifacts. It means, there’s something that’s been found in an archaeological dig or written down thousands of years ago that does not fit in our concept of history. Gliders found in ancient Egypt and Maya that, when precisely blown up in size, fly by themselves with little to no propelling power. Giant batteries in ancient Iraq. Pyramids that generate power. Depictions of using electricity and mind-control. And much more.

Sure, some of it can be conspiracy theory. Some people take all of these things and say that aliens visited us thousands of years ago. But why does it have to be aliens? Why can’t humanity have been as smart as to create computers and airplanes and batteries thousands of years ago — and then something happened?

And since I write fiction, I don’t have to care if it’s all absolutely true or not. I can run with it… and turn it into something awesome. *cue evil grin*

Further along on the formation of this idea, there is a lot of evidence that suggests a giant catastrophe (as in, a giant flood) swept the entire globe a few millennia ago. A catastrophe big enough to turn the earth slight on it’s axis. A catastrophe big enough to leave giant pockets of vegetation and decaying bodies that are hard to explain in any other way.

This is besides the fact that every culture on the planet has a flood myth.

Now, I’m not a religious person. I don’t want to prove or disprove the idea of a biblical flood sent down by a God of this culture or the next because we were all bad people. But the concept of something like this is awe-some — and I ran with it.

I utilized the favorite tool of the writer: the “What Ifs.”

What if humanity progressed to a technological level we weren’t supposed to go? What if we broke an unspoken rule, a rule we’d forgotten was made, a promise we’d forgot to keep?

Who would be there to put us back in line?

 

Then it all started coming together. All of the fun Oopart technology and Bibical history and environmentalist themes takes place around this story:

Sofija left home to learn about defense against warfare. Her peace-loving family and village is continually plagued by the Kurgans, the warring civilization to the East. But when she left home, they came…

Stuck on the Green Isles, trapped in a fort seiged by demons every night as it desperately tries to save it’s technology, Sofija just wants to go home. Her family is all probably dead anyway — but she has to see for herself.

 

 

Everything changes when she inadvertently kills one of the Princes of the demons, gaining the loyalty of one of their most precious steeds. He’s a black, flesh-eating horse born from the molten core of the planet — and now he’s irrevocably hers. And in doing so, Sofija may have just been handed the only possible chance at understanding why the demons are here, and what they really want.

With the flood still in mind (and I’m definitely not throwing out the idea an actual flood will occur), I titled it “Flood Without Water.” I wrote the beginning of this story for a novella contest I never actually ended up entering, but it’s been in the back of my mind for a while now.

Then, the other day, my publisher asked me about writing a short story for their blog that used five favorite words picked by their head editor. The words given to me were: assemblage, labyrinthine, brood, nemesis, and inure. I had to look that last word up, but almost as soon as I had the words, Sofija and her devil-horse started talking.

So I ran with it.

And I came up with this.

Let me know what you think. I’m pretty excited about this one.

(Also, for fun, I created a Pinterest board where I’ve started collecting concept art for the whole series. Check it out if you’ve got time!)


Creativity Cycles

Apparently mid-summer is the time of year where writing blog posts is more of a chore than usual. I think every year now, during the summer, I’ve written consistently less posts than during the winter.

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Anybody else noticing this trend? I don’t have children, so I can’t blame it on that. I was more busy during the summer this year than I was last year, so maybe there’s something there. I don’t enjoy the sun all that much, so it’s not like I’m outside instead of writing posts.

It’s like I lose interest during that time of year.

Once Fall hits and Winter starts to make it’s grand entrance, it’s easier to blog. Or, it seems more natural to, to be accurate.

I’ve been thinking a lot about Seasonal Anxiety Disorder (mostly because I’m pretty sure I have it but don’t want to admit to it) and am wondering if it’s connected. Starting in June, when the light begins to leave, my blogging tapers off. In the depth of winter, particularly January (when the light is starting to return), I seem to get a rush of creative energy.

I used to assume I was just a night owl and was most productive when there was a lot of dark. Which, may still be true, though I’m finding my absolute best time to work is late morning/early afternoon.

Anyway, I noticed this trend in myself. Do you have an annual cycle that you go through? What’s your favorite time of day to write, or light situation that suits you best?