Category Archives: The Interesting and Informative, by Others

Accepting Representation Etiquette

Here is an interesting post on accepting representation etiquette that we all should probably be aware of: A Longer Quiz! (part one)

Thoughts?


Organic IS Better (for book marketing)

This article has some great points, though part of me despairs by asking “then what AM I supposed to be doing to convince people to come see me?” It seems connected to the “pull not push” element that was discussed in these two posts here: https://awakedragon.wordpress.com/2016/02/01/two-great-articles-about-writers-on-social-media/

The Reblog button seems broken, so, to read this article by Author Chris McMullen, click on the link or image below: organic-is-better-for-book-marketing/

Source: Organic IS Better (for book marketing)


Two Great Articles About Writers on Social Media

In my research on developing a kick-ass author platform, as dictated by one of my New Year Goals (https://awakedragon.wordpress.com/2016/01/07/beginning-the-new-year-with-sand/), I have been reading about this subject lot. Now, these two articles are not necessarily a “how to” of being an author on social media and developing a platform, but are geared more towards etiquette and how not to annoy everyone in the universe.

Mostly, it struck a cord in me how much I related. I thought I would direct your attention towards them for our shared ruminations – tell me what you think!

Please Shut Up: Why Self-Promotion as an Author Doesn’t Work

And her rebuttal to her own self:

Wait, Keep Talking: Author Self Promotion that Actually Works

I love these articles mostly because of how well they fit into my experiences on social media as of yet. But she’s also making a lot of sense.

What do you think? Have you been noticing something like this?


Fiction Friday: 8 Things Writers Forget When Writing Fight Scenes

Here are a few helpful tips on fight scenes

Lisa Voisin

eight

Recently, I attended a session called “Writing About Fighting” at VCON, a science fict ion and fantasy conference. The panel consisted of writers and experts who were disciplined in multiple martial arts, including authors Lorna Suzuki and T.G. Shepherd, and Devon Boorman, the swordmaster of Academie Duello in Vancouver.

For me, this talk was so fascinating, it was worth the cost of admission alone. I spent days thinking about the topics discussed and tried to incorporate them into The Watcher Saga. These are just a few of them as I remember it.

Eight Things Writers Forget About Fight Scenes:

1. It’s not about the technical details

First of all, if you’re not technical and don’t know the details of fighting, you shouldn’t try to write about them. Some writers try to to include technical details of fighting, which only calls out their lack of expertise. If you don’t know what…

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Tips for Writing About Forests

Good thoughts for authors needing to write about forests!

Write for the King

Three Things Writers Tend to Get Wrong: Forests, Fainting, and Hunting

(Please note that this post has been revised as of 10/12/2015)

Forests appear in many fictional and nonfictional novels. If you are writing about a non-fictional forest, I would highly suggest that you research that specific forest for your novel. If you are writing about a fictional forest, then it might be a good idea to base it off of a real fictional forest. However, as a writer myself, I understand that research is time consuming and really distracting. So I have gathered, for you, a few tips for writing about forests from my own experience.

Six Tips for Writing About Forests

Here are six tips for writing about forests:

  1. Trails: Forests, without heavy human traffic, will not have a trail which leads exactly where the character needs to go. If people do not visit the forest on a consistent basis (as…

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A NaNoWriMo Survival Guide

READ THIS. Simply put and very helpful.

Herminia Chow

A NaNoWriMo Survival Guide

So you’re prepared for all that November throws at you.

  • What to do if you’re “exhausted”
    1. Sleep
    2. Eat
    3. Relax
    4. Shower
    5. Exercise
  • What to do if you’re “uninspired”
    1. Get by
    2. Get out
    3. Get away
    4. Get going
    5. Get together
  • What to do if you’re “blocked”
    1. Take a walk
    2. Call a friend
    3. Read a book
    4. Listen to music
    5. Explore the neighborhood
  • What to do if you’re “lost”
    1. Pull out your outline
    2. Ask a complete stranger
    3. Get even more lost
    4. Distance yourself for now
    5. Let your characters roam
  • What to do if you’re “busy”
    1. Learn when to say no
    2. Give up what you can
    3. Reduce time with other activities
    4. Force yourself to just start
    5. Do not accept any excuses

There you have it. Five scenarios you may encounter during NaNo and five solutions for each one.

I hope you survive!

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Injuring Characters: How much is too much?

Good thoughts and advice about something that doesn’t immediately spring to the forefront of your thinking!

Red Lettering

Injuring Characters

When we talked about realistic injuries, I mentioned briefly how some people over-injure their characters. Instead of going into it on that post, I said that it was a topic for another time. That time is today.

Before starting writing this, I did a Google search with the words “How often should I injure my characters?” When that failed to bring up any satisfactory results, I switched around the words, used only certain words without any proper sentence structure, tried more specific questions and came up with—

Oh, you guessed.

—absolutely nothing.

I found several pages worth of why you should hurt your characters, how to write realistic injuries, how to describe hurt characters, how to deepen characters through injuries, and many other things, but I didn’t come across how often you should injure your characters. Maybe Google just doesn’t like me today, or maybe I picked the wrong words…

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